Energy performance certificate (EPC)


Energy rating

E

6, Richmond Terrace
Station Road
WHITCHURCH
SY13 1RH

7 April 2019

0888-8080-6264-6501-4030

Total floor area
138 square metres

Rules on letting this property

Properties can be rented if they have an energy rating from A to E.

If the property is rated F or G, it cannot be let, unless an exemption has been registered. You can read guidance for landlords on the regulations and exemptions.

Energy efficiency rating for this property

This property’s current energy rating is E. It has the potential to be D.

See how to improve this property’s energy performance.

Energy efficiency chart This property’s current energy rating is E with a score of 53. It has a potential energy rating of D with a score of 66.

The graph shows this property’s current and potential energy efficiency.

Properties are given a rating from A (most efficient) to G (least efficient).

Properties are also given a score. The higher the number the lower your fuel bills are likely to be.

For properties in England and Wales:

  • the average energy rating is D
  • the average energy score is 60

Breakdown of property’s energy performance

This section shows the energy performance for features of this property. The assessment does not consider the condition of a feature and how well it is working.

Each feature is assessed as one of the following:

  • very good (most efficient)
  • good
  • average
  • poor
  • very poor (least efficient)

When the description says “assumed”, it means that the feature could not be inspected and an assumption has been made based on the property’s age and type.

Feature Description Rating
Wall Solid brick, as built, no insulation (assumed) Very poor
Roof Pitched, 150 mm loft insulation Good
Roof Pitched, limited insulation (assumed) Very poor
Window Fully double glazed Average
Main heating Boiler and radiators, mains gas Good
Main heating control Programmer, no room thermostat Very poor
Hot water From main system Good
Lighting No low energy lighting Very poor
Floor Solid, no insulation (assumed) N/A
Secondary heating Room heaters, mains gas N/A

Primary energy use

The primary energy use for this property per year is 328 kilowatt hours per square metre (kWh/m2).

What is primary energy use?

Primary energy use is a measure of the energy required for lighting, heating and hot water in a property. The calculation includes:

  • the efficiency of the property’s heating system
  • power station efficiency for electricity
  • the energy used to produce the fuel and deliver it to the property

Environmental impact of this property

One of the biggest contributors to climate change is carbon dioxide (CO2). The energy used for heating, lighting and power in our homes produces over a quarter of the UK’s CO2 emissions.

An average household produces
6 tonnes of CO2
This property produces
7.0 tonnes of CO2
This property’s potential production
5.2 tonnes of CO2

By making the recommended changes, you could reduce this property’s CO2 emissions by 1.8 tonnes per year. This will help to protect the environment.

Environmental impact ratings are based on assumptions about average occupancy and energy use. They may not reflect how energy is consumed by the people living at the property.

How to improve this property’s energy performance

Potential energy rating

D

Making any of the recommended changes will improve this property’s energy efficiency.

If you make all of the recommended changes, this will improve the property’s energy rating and score from E (53) to D (66).

What is an energy rating?
An energy rating shows a property’s energy efficiency.

Properties are given a rating from A (most efficient) to G (least efficient).

Properties are also given a score. The higher this number, the lower your CO2 emissions are likely to be.

Recommendation 1: Low energy lighting

Replacement of traditional light bulbs with energy saving recommended ones will reduce lighting costs over the lifetime of the bulb, and they last up to 12 times longer than ordinary light bulbs. Also consider selecting low energy light fittings when redecorating; contact the Lighting Association for your nearest stockist of Domestic Energy Efficient Lighting Scheme fittings.

Typical installation cost
Information unavailable
Typical yearly saving
£47
Potential rating after carrying out recommendation 1
band-d 56 | D

Recommendation 2: Heating controls (room thermostat and thermostatic radiator valves)

A room thermostat will increase the efficiency of the heating system by enabling the boiler to switch off when no heat is required; this will reduce the amount of energy used and lower fuel bills. Thermostatic radiator valves should also be installed, to allow the temperature of each room to be controlled to suit individual needs, adding to comfort and reducing heating bills provided internal doors are kept closed. For example, they can be set to be warmer in the living room and bathroom than in the bedrooms. Ask a competent heating engineer to install thermostatic radiator valves and a fully pumped system with the pump and the boiler turned off by the room thermostat. Thermostatic radiator valves should be fitted to every radiator except for the radiator in the same room as the room thermostat. Remember the room thermostat is needed as well as the thermostatic radiator valves, to enable the boiler to switch off when no heat is required.

Typical installation cost
Information unavailable
Typical yearly saving
£142
Potential rating after carrying out recommendations 1 and 2
band-d 62 | D

Recommendation 3: Band A condensing boiler

A condensing boiler is capable of much higher efficiencies than other types of boiler, meaning it will burn less fuel to heat this property. This improvement is most appropriate when the existing central heating boiler needs repair or replacement, but there may be exceptional circumstances making this impractical. Condensing boilers need a drain for the condensate which limits their location; remember this when considering remodelling the room containing the existing boiler even if the latter is to be retained for the time being (for example a kitchen makeover). Building Regulations apply to this work, so your local authority building control department should be informed, unless the installer is registered with a competent persons scheme?, and can therefore self-certify the work for Building Regulation compliance. Ask a qualified heating engineer to explain the options.

Typical installation cost
Information unavailable
Typical yearly saving
£95
Potential rating after carrying out recommendations 1 to 3
band-d 66 | D

Recommendation 4: Internal or external wall insulation

Solid wall insulation involves adding a layer of insulation to either the inside or the outside surface of the external walls, which reduces heat loss and lowers fuel bills. As it is more expensive than cavity wall insulation it is only recommended for walls without a cavity, or where for technical reasons a cavity cannot be filled. Internal insulation, known as dry-lining, is where a layer of insulation is fixed to the inside surface of external walls; this type of insulation is best applied when rooms require redecorating and can be installed by a competent DIY enthusiast. External solid wall insulation is the application of an insulant and a weather-protective finish to the outside of the wall. This may improve the look of the home, particularly where existing brickwork or rendering is poor, and will provide long-lasting weather protection. Further information can be obtained from the National Insulation Association (www.nationalinsulationassociation.org.uk). It should be noted that planning permission might be required.

Typical installation cost
Information unavailable
Typical yearly saving
£159
Potential rating after carrying out recommendations 1 to 4
band-c 72 | C

Recommendation 5: Solar photovoltaic (PV) panels

A solar PV system is one which converts light directly into electricity via panels placed on the roof with no waste and no emissions. This electricity is used throughout the home in the same way as the electricity purchased from an energy supplier. The British Photovoltaic Association has up-to-date information on local installers who are qualified electricians and on any grant that may be available. Planning restrictions may apply in certain neighbourhoods and you should check this with the local authority. Building Regulations apply to this work, so your local authority building control department should be informed, unless the installer is appropriately qualified and registered as such with a competent persons scheme?, and can therefore self-certify the work for Building Regulation compliance.

Typical installation cost
Information unavailable
Typical yearly saving
£159
Potential rating after carrying out recommendations 1 to 5
band-c 80 | C

Estimated energy use and potential savings

Estimated yearly energy cost for this property
£1171
Potential saving
£284

The estimated cost shows how much the average household would spend in this property for heating, lighting and hot water. It is not based on how energy is used by the people living at the property.

The estimated saving is based on making all of the recommendations in how to improve this property’s energy performance.

For advice on how to reduce your energy bills visit Simple Energy Advice.

Heating use in this property

Heating a property usually makes up the majority of energy costs.

Potential energy savings by installing insulation

The assessor did not find any opportunities to save energy by installing insulation in this property.

You might be able to receive Renewable Heat Incentive payments. This will help to reduce carbon emissions by replacing your existing heating system with one that generates renewable heat. The estimated energy required for space and water heating will form the basis of the payments.

Contacting the assessor and accreditation scheme

This EPC was created by a qualified energy assessor.

If you are unhappy about your property’s energy assessment or certificate, you can complain to the assessor directly.

If you are still unhappy after contacting the assessor, you should contact the assessor’s accreditation scheme.

Accreditation schemes are appointed by the government to ensure that assessors are qualified to carry out EPC assessments.

Assessor contact details

Assessor’s name
John White
Telephone
08700 850490

Accreditation scheme contact details

Accreditation scheme
Elmhurst Energy Systems Ltd
Assessor ID
EES/004742
Telephone
01455 883 250

Assessment details

Assessor’s declaration
No assessor’s declaration provided
Date of assessment
8 April 2009
Date of certificate
8 April 2009
Type of assessment
RdSAP
RdSAP (Reduced data Standard Assessment Procedure) is a method used to assess and compare the energy and environmental performance of properties in the UK. It uses a site visit and survey of the property to calculate energy performance.

This type of assessment can be carried out on properties built before 1 April 2008 in England and Wales, and 30 September 2008 in Northern Ireland. It can also be used for newer properties, as long as they have a previous SAP assessment, which uses detailed information about the property’s construction to calculate energy performance.

Other certificates for this property

If you are aware of previous certificates for this property and they are not listed here, please contact us at mhclg.digital-services@communities.gov.uk or call our helpdesk on 020 3829 0748.

Certificate number
8683-6428-6860-3049-0906
Valid until
31 July 2027